Cleaning up a wound

This tree is an air-layer of my Chishio Japanese Maple.

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The base has been carefully worked, it’s been in and out of the ground, had new branches grafted into the right places, and now it’s time to address the big ugly pruning scar. It looks far worse from this side than the front, but since it’s going back into the ground for a couple more years to fatten up, I thought I would take advantage of the accelerated growth rate the ground offers and close this wound. In March, I scalloped the deadwood to make room for the callus, exposed the cambium, packed the area with a little sphagnum moss, and wrapped the wound with raffia. Constant humidity around the callus can hasten its growth:

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By early October, 7 months later, here is the reveal:

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No doubt it will finish closing in the next growing season, and we can get on to better things like finishing up the trunk and developing the primary branches.

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4 thoughts on “Cleaning up a wound

  1. Hi Brian, was this done at the end of March and if so what was the temperature outside or did you put it in a greenhouse?

    Thanks

    Ray

    Subject: [New post] Cleaning up a wound

    Brian VF posted: “This tree is an air-layer of my Chishio Japanese Maple. The base has been carefully worked, it’s been in and out of the ground, had new branches grafted into the right places, and now it’s time to address the big ugly pruning scar. It looks far worse “

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