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Posts from the ‘Trident Maple’ Category

Summer defoliation on a Trident Maple

This root-over-Rock trident was started about 11 years ago, and the leaves will reduce down to 1/2″ with constant trimming. Defoliating is used not to reduce leaf size, but to provide some visibility into what’s happening inside the canopy. If an area is getting too coarse inside the canopy, it’s difficult to see. So, in mid-June, I removed all the leaves to get a look. The growing season is long enough that it can continue to grow.

Before:

After:

Close-up shot of the coarse branches that need to be pruned back to bifrucating pairs:

And after pruning:

A month later, the tree is full again, but notice the larger leaf size:

Now, pinching will resume for the rest of the growing season, removing the strong shoots that grow past the profile, and large leaves. This pinching is what produces small leaves and shorter internodes; here is a shot in mid-August, after constant trimming to prevent long shoots from running outside the profile.

And after the pruning while defoliated, more these new branches can be kept as part of the next course of ramification.

During the remainder of the growing season, larger leaves will be removed to allow light in. Leaving smaller leaves helps maintain the scale.

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Wanna see something nasty?

Me neither, but nevertheless, I noticed some white flecks on this trident early in the spring. They didn’t come off easily, and weren’t moving either, so I just kind of ignored them.

3/20/19, easy to see in a night shot with flash:

Then on April 14, I noticed some white spots on the undersides of a few leaves. Get ready…nasty. Scale:

So the infested leaves were removed, and the trunk got a good scrubbing with a stiff wash of Malathion to kill the remaining eggs or whatever they were.

The next day:

And still a few scale bugs to remove:

And on the road to recovery just a few days later:

And after weeks, not a bug to be found, and it’s growing again, and ready for a haircut.

Stay vigilant, my friend.

D & E Trees

Just after Christmas, a friend and I took a road trip to Maysville, GA, just northeast of Atlanta, to D & E Trees. Owner Dave Lapeyrouse met us at the gate in his 4-wheeler and drove us back into the beautiful rolling-hilled property to the growing fields.

There we were greeted by Dave’s trees, many planted a quarter-century ago for the purpose of Bonsai. Dave favors trident maples, Japanese black pines, and stewartia, and had a couple thousand to choose from. You tag, he dig.

Here are a few photos of the fields.

Stewartia:

Trident maples:

Japanese black pines:

Dave doesn’t ship, but if you’re looking for big material at a very reasonable price, email him at livingartbonsai@aol.com, or call him at 985-688-3682.